Starting From Happy

Starting From Happy

A Novel

Book - 2011
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While waiting in line for apple pie at a party, Imogene Gilfeather, a lingerie designer who does not understand the reason for romance, meets Wally Yez, a scientist whose business card says "An Answer for Everything." Imogene is told that Wally is the perfect guy. ("Perfect," she replies, "is not my type.") He is told that her company, Featherware, manufactures intimates ( that gets his attention). Unfazed by Imogene's indifference (who needs love when you have a career, friends, and an undemanding affair with a married man?), Wally resolves to win her over. E-mails turn into late-night phone calls; one date turns into two and then into more. Thus begins the most absurd and amusingly unbalanced relationship to grace the pages of a novel.

Wally is certain he and Imogene are meant for each other (They both use mechanical pencils! Neither has had mumps! They are so alike!), but convincing his beloved is another matter. ("Do you know why it is I don't have pierced ears?" she asks. "Because it's too permanent.") In defiance of the odds, or the gods, or perhaps just Imogene's qualms, Wally and Imogene become a pair. They celebrate their anniversaries-the first time they touched each other on purpose, took public transportation together, saw the other with wet hair. But can they possibly end as happily as they've begun? ("Does he really have a cowlick? If yes, no bed will ever be big enough.")

Made up of hundreds of chaplettes, clever illustrations, and darkly funny commentary on getting together and staying the course, Starting from Happy is a cunning and sophisticated send-up of coupledom that showcases one of the finest comic writers of our time.
Publisher: New York ; Toronto : Scribner, 2011
Edition: 1st Scribner hardcover ed. --
ISBN: 9781439101285
1439101280
Branch Call Number: FIC Marx 3558ad 1
Characteristics: xv, 234 p. :,ill

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AnneDromeda Sep 12, 2011

Once, in the final year of my undergrad, I lost my mind in essay format. It was the gruelling end of a weird semester and the course was Linguistic Epistemology (or Underwater Basket-weaving, if you prefer). For the final essay, I was supposed to investigate the possibility of expressing a natura... Read More »


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r
rachelbard
Oct 09, 2015

Crazy! Great fun.

a
andreareads
Mar 15, 2012

I should have stopped reading at "Bowwow bah bah woof ribbit ribbit meow moo coo roar."

ColemanRidge Oct 24, 2011

You know how about every fifth New Yorker cartoon you can see how someone would be amused by it, but just aren't? Like that. Give it a whirl, though. Maybe you are the target audience. Besides, the index is funny. There aren't nearly enough funny indexes.

l
LZLibrary
Oct 24, 2011

Marx has written for Saturday Night Live. And like many of SNL's skits that are hilarious for 5 minutes of television but become tiresome when made into a full-length film, "Starting from Happy" starts out feeling kind of clever but quickly becomes wearing and feels a bit gimmicky. A light, quick and often funny read, but short on character, plot and substance.

AnneDromeda Sep 12, 2011

Once, in the final year of my undergrad, I lost my mind in essay format. It was the gruelling end of a weird semester and the course was Linguistic Epistemology (or Underwater Basket-weaving, if you prefer). For the final essay, I was supposed to investigate the possibility of expressing a natural language's functions entirely in symbolic logic.<br />

Long story short, I went barking on stress and 5 different caffeine delivery options, and threw the whole notion out the window with 12 hours to go. Natural language isn't a logically coherent system. Can't be. Humans use it. Have you met humans? Half of them can't figure out how to text each other, and the other half have murdered natural language. I filled 20 pages with a manic ode to joyous illogic in nonverbal communication. For my breakdown, I received a generous mark in the mid-70s.<br />

This isn't a non sequitur to distract you from the fact that there's no book review happening. Honest. The same kind of panic-fuelled adventure in chemistry and extreme sleeplessness seems to have propelled Patricia Marx's <i>Starting From Happy</i>. Right from the get-go, it's apparent that Marx is meeting a book contract the most gleeful way she knows how – as obviously as possible.<br />

<i>Starting From Happy</i> opens with a “PROLEGOMENON” meant, as Marx notes in wistful sarcasm, to have been penned by Philip Roth. Except, he “backed out.” After trying to get several other authors - Toni Morrison, Joyce Carol Oates, Cormac McCarthy (who was “under the weather, existentially speaking”), Alice Munro, Margaret Atwood, and the deceased John Updike - to pen the intro and pad her word count, Marx gives up. She spends the rest of her own intro typing animal sounds to hit word count and avoid litigation. She closes the book with fan/hate mail and an index that uses imaginary numbers to refer to nonexistent people and events. You have to admire the panache.<br />

But how's the book in between? Without question, this is the funniest book I've read this year. Arranged in tiny chaplettes of a few sentences rather than chapters, Marx uses the their brevity to create a kind of mosaic sketch of the lives of Immogene and Wally, the couple at the centre of <i>Starting From Happy</i>. It follows their disjointed NYC courtship and social scene through their lives together, stringing together a genuinely touching story out of a series of blisteringly sarcastic fragments of scenes and conversations. <br />

By the time you finish <i>Starting From Happy</i> you might be confused, but you'll also be bowled-over by the sheer blazing postmodernism of the project. By letting all the seams show, Marx constructs a novel that has deeply clever things to say about what literature means in the twilight years of the paper book's reign. If you took Comp Lit and people have a hard time knowing whether you're kidding, you should probably read this book.<br />

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AnneDromeda Sep 12, 2011

Once, in the final year of my undergrad, I lost my mind in essay format. It was the gruelling end of a weird semester and the course was Linguistic Epistemology (or Underwater Basket-weaving, if you prefer). For the final essay, I was supposed to investigate the possibility of expressing a natural language's functions entirely in symbolic logic.<br />

Long story short, I went barking on stress and 5 different caffeine delivery options, and threw the whole notion out the window with 12 hours to go. Natural language isn't a logically coherent system. Can't be. Humans use it. Have you met humans? Half of them can't figure out how to text each other, and the other half have murdered natural language. I filled 20 pages with a manic ode to joyous illogic in nonverbal communication. For my breakdown, I received a generous mark in the mid-70s.<br />

This isn't a non sequitur to distract you from the fact that there's no book review happening. Honest. The same kind of panic-fuelled adventure in chemistry and extreme sleeplessness seems to have propelled Patricia Marx's <i>Starting From Happy</i>. Right from the get-go, it's apparent that Marx is meeting a book contract the most gleeful way she knows how – as obviously as possible.<br />

<i>Starting From Happy</i> opens with a “PROLEGOMENON” meant, as Marx notes in wistful sarcasm, to have been penned by Philip Roth. Except, he “backed out.” After trying to get several other authors - Toni Morrison, Joyce Carol Oates, Cormac McCarthy (who was “under the weather, existentially speaking”), Alice Munro, Margaret Atwood, and the deceased John Updike - to pen the intro and pad her word count, Marx gives up. She spends the rest of her own intro typing animal sounds to hit word count and avoid litigation. She closes the book with fan/hate mail and an index that uses imaginary numbers to refer to nonexistent people and events. You have to admire the panache.<br />

But how's the book in between? Without question, this is the funniest book I've read this year. Arranged in tiny chaplettes of a few sentences rather than chapters, Marx uses the their brevity to create a kind of mosaic sketch of the lives of Immogene and Wally, the couple at the centre of <i>Starting From Happy</i>. It follows their disjointed NYC courtship and social scene through their lives together, stringing together a genuinely touching story out of a series of blisteringly sarcastic fragments of scenes and conversations. <br />

By the time you finish <i>Starting From Happy</i> you might be confused, but you'll also be bowled-over by the sheer blazing postmodernism of the project. By letting all the seams show, Marx constructs a novel that has deeply clever things to say about what literature means in the twilight years of the paper book's reign. If you took Comp Lit and people have a hard time knowing whether you're kidding, you should probably read this book.<br />

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